We typically are NOT getting enough donations to pay the monthly server bill. We need your help! Click the thermometer to learn more.
Note: clicking on the above banners and making ANY purchase returns a commission to Turker Nation.
If you can't see the ad, please click on Shop on Amazon instead. | Want to advertise here? PM Spamgirl to learn more!




Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 28

Thread: Yay bee's!

  1. #11
    Wow it didn't notify me until now of new post's in this thread, sorry to be so behind on a topic I started folks!

    Quote Originally Posted by EMfromOZ View Post
    I, too, am allergic. But I was so glad to see so many of them buzzing all over my peach and crabapple trees, that I took the risk to get close enough to photograph them at close range last month.
    Yes I deal with a bee/wasp allergy also thankfully nothing fatal but a sure pain and hassle! I find that bee's don't ever bother with me, unless I have the wrong colors on (such as yellow or orange). I consider myself lucky there.

    Quote Originally Posted by purplestarfishx View Post
    Bees are good! Has anyone seen the Nature documentary on the vanishing bees?

    You can watch the full episode here: http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/episo...l-episode/251/
    Ah yes I remember when that video came out, very informative. Good find on the link thank for posting!

    Quote Originally Posted by jumpingRabbit View Post
    Plant wildflowers and flowering shrubs/bushes/trees that are NATIVE to your area. I've spotted at least four types of bees in our native patch so far this year. It's nice because they come for the natives, but stay to help my veggies.
    You know I have been preparing and planning to redo this one flower bed we have for next year and I have been wanting to find more native plants to integrate. (It's a mess I need to start amending for a while before I even try to plant so it'll be next spring before new life in there.) Thank you very much for the helpful suggestion I'll have to talk to some of staff at my local nursery see what annual's and such we have that are native to the Pacific Northwest.
    Last edited by Jebediah; 05-21-2012 at 01:43 AM.

  2. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Gender
    Female
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    139
    Thanks
    8
    Thanked 41 Times in 22 Posts

    Bumblebees are my favorite, too. Every time I see one it makes me smile because I am looking at an impossibility.

  3. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Gender
    Female
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    140
    Thanks
    303
    Thanked 64 Times in 34 Posts

    I'm still trying to get my garden going. I've had such a black thumb in the past, and I really hate to kill more plants. But I enjoy others gardens. I have noticed many more bees this year in my mother-in-law's garden and it's great to see. When my husband & I really retire, I'm going to start keeping bees, I love them and they seem to like me too. HURRAY BEES !!

  4. #14
    Member Honua's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Gender
    Female
    Location
    SWWA
    Posts
    190
    Thanks
    106
    Thanked 182 Times in 97 Posts

    I plant Emperor Scarlet Runner Beans on wire trellises behind (on the north side of) my raised beds. They are really wonderful in so many ways! They have brilliant red flowers that attract bees and hummingbirds. They grow several feet tall. The pods can be nearly a foot long when mature and produce huge beans that you can dry for the winter. When they are young, you can blanch them and eat them whole. As a legume, they add nitrogen to the soil, I'm pretty sure. A really nice, multitasking veggy to add to your garden.

    I planted about thirty last week and I just noticed this morning that they are poking their lil heads out already.

    More info from GardenWeb: http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/l...214128749.html

  5. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Honua For This Useful Post:


  6. #15
    Thank you Honua! Very helpful information, and the link is appreciated. Getting some good information going here.

    And congrat's on the sign's of life! Love to watch seedling's turn into mature plants.

    (P.s. WOOT! Pacific northwest gardener's rule!!)

  7. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Honua View Post
    I plant Emperor Scarlet Runner Beans on wire trellises behind (on the north side of) my raised beds. They are really wonderful in so many ways! They have brilliant red flowers that attract bees and hummingbirds. They grow several feet tall. The pods can be nearly a foot long when mature and produce huge beans that you can dry for the winter. When they are young, you can blanch them and eat them whole. As a legume, they add nitrogen to the soil, I'm pretty sure. A really nice, multitasking veggy to add to your garden.

    I planted about thirty last week and I just noticed this morning that they are poking their lil heads out already.

    More info from GardenWeb: http://forums.gardenweb.com/forums/l...214128749.html
    I too, am a big fan of Scarlet Runners. I've grown some for a few years already, and have seen some grow to 10-12 feet tall in the right conditions. I don't have the Emperor variety, they're more bright orange than red, but they're also really showy and they make a beautiful backdrop for the garden. I also have different runner beans that have some purple or white or yellow flowers. None of them grow as tall as the Scarlet Runners, though. I've often cooked and refried the dried beans (yum!), and I've recently discovered that if you take the time to sprout and then refry them, they're even better (seems to be even sweeter).

    Getting back to the subject of bees, you're right that it's a mystery. http://www.naturalnews.com/033781_ho...esticides.html .
    It's not 97%, though, more like 35%
    If you want a quirky way to help them out, check out http://beestation.com/
    A more feasible and natural way might be to sow some clover in your grass - They love clover, and it's also good for the lawn, since clover, just like all legumes and peas, fixes nitrogen into the soil - which means less fertilizing... I like seeing those little white flowers in among the grass, I don't feel the need to have the perfect Kentucky bluegrass lawn. I think monoculture is an aberration.

    Sorry if that was a little ranty.

  8. The Following User Says Thank You to eddypoe For This Useful Post:


  9. #17
    97% was a quote from a documentary I saw once but I have never found information backing for higher than 92%. And furthermore it was isolated to a one year epedemic case. (for lack of better word if my terminology is incorrect) But upon further research the records from 08-09 studies indeed showed a steady 35% average decline in bee population. I wish there was a way to find out how much of the wild bee population was effected...

  10. #18
    Member Lonny's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Gender
    Female
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    685
    Thanks
    854
    Thanked 847 Times in 355 Posts

    Oddly enough, the years we have tons of fireflies (like this year) we don't have many bees, and vice versa.
    I do wish we had more clover. It's a great grass alternative, and it does really well here, but the plantain and the things that aren't dandelions but look like them have pretty much choked it out.

  11. #19
    I was mistakenly added to the email list for a group of beekeepers from another state. Even before that happened, I fantasized about keeping bees, but after reading their news and tips, I want to do it even more. Unfortunately I'm not sure my neighbors would approve! (Although I have thought about bribing them with honey.)

  12. #20
    I moved a couple months ago to a place with wonderful gardens. We are plush with bees right now, but the honeybees are wild about the oregano, which has blossomed recently. Oregano - who knew?

  13. The Following User Says Thank You to compensatedcat For This Useful Post:


Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •