Click Here
Note: clicking on the above banners and making ANY purchase returns a commission to Turker Nation.
If you can't see the ad, please click on Shop on Amazon instead. | Want to advertise here? PM Spamgirl to learn more!


Follow CrowdSurf on Turk Alert | Check out their HITs on mTurk

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Amazon's plagiarism problem

  1. #1

    Amazon's plagiarism problem

    Apparently there are a bunch of people who take erotic literature posted on free websites and pass it off as their own in Amazon ebooks. Amazon's reaction to this kind of copyright infringement sounds like what we've seen from scammers on mturk. (Article is SFW, but it does talk about some pretty racy titles.)

    Amazon's plagiarism problem

    Amazon's policy is to remove offending content when it receives complaints of plagiarism. Erotica author Elizabeth Summers had at least 65 titles expunged when plagiarism allegations surfaced. Recently Robin Scott's books also disappeared from Amazon when writers complained. (Scott, which is almost assuredly not her — his? — real name, did not respond to requests for an interview over Twitter.) But this reactive approach isn't entirely effective. After users in a Kindle forum griped about Maria Cruz, her entire cache of ebooks — all 51 of them — were deleted, but in the days that followed she posted a whole new set of material, mostly collections of porn pictures although there were a few traditional text-based works, too.

  2. #2
    Member Fuinernel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    141
    I saw something about this a few days ago. I enjoy writing stories and poems, but it's stuff like this that makes me think twice about posting them online in blogs, Facebook notes or in the thread on this board that's dedicated to poetical musings. I really would love to share my work, but the prospect of others potentially putting their name on it and profiting even a little from it leaves me feeling bitter. Maybe that makes me a selfish, narcissistic pessimist, but where my work ends up after I make it freely available does concern me. Even if I considered my work to be of no reasonable monetary value, there are ways people can shove it around and make money off it, even if its terribly modest. What makes the process profitable is they can do it with hundreds or thousands of authors' works, throwing new stuff up if the old stuff gets caught. Even if each Ebook makes a modest sum, it adds up. Considering the person profiting didn't have to produce the content in the first place, it becomes worth it for them to do. What's of even greater concern is Amazon's track record for handling this. There need to be more safeguards in place for detecting plagiarism before books go up for sale. Dracula's Amazing Adventures, which is nothing more than Bram Stoker with a cheap title change, and Alice in Wonderland should not be able to go up in the first place. However, while they're up and making money, Amazon is getting a cut, so Amazon's bottom line benefits from these works staying up for few months before being pulled down. I'm not trying to say Amazon is in cahoots with the plagiarizers, but the fact they benefit from them in any way should give cause for concern and be a reason for greater scrutiny and pressure from legitimate writers and content producers.

    On a side note, a good friend of mine is involved in weaving and felting and posts on forums. Recently, he posted a long explanation dedicated to a style of felting he had devised. He was perplexed when a fellow forum member thanked him profusely for the explanation but advised him to take it down immediately. When he told me about this, I told him about this article and the rampant plagiarism among all areas of the eBook world. The problem is, when people post helpful information like that, or if they post their own literary work, it's very simple and easy for someone to come along, rip off the content, throw it in to an eBook and start making money off of someone else's work.

    Sorry if I went on a bit of a rant, but this issue really gets my goat.
    Last edited by Fuinernel; 01-16-2012 at 03:45 PM.

  3. #3
    Wow, this actually has me a little nervous. I've submitted many of my completed articles to an online database that then sells these articles to webmasters who need original content. But how do I know that my articles actually stay 'mine'? Hmmm. Off to do a search on google for my own work....
    Thank for the heads up!

  4. #4
    I try to stay away from writing hits because if I come up with something really good, it isn't mine any more. I guess I can't use all my good ideas. On the other hand, you don't want to write a book one day that was similar to an article you wrote for a requester and have to deal with plagiarism because the requester now owns that article and says you are plagiarizing it.

  5. #5
    Member aebaum91's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Gender
    Female
    Location
    Midwest USA
    Posts
    342
    Wow, this really makes you think! I had a poetry blog that got kind of popular, but deleted due to lack of time to update. It's strange to think people simply take others materials and attempt to make a profit from them.

  6. #6
    Member bunky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Baton Rouge, LA
    Posts
    103
    I delete my writing HITs document as soon as I am done. I do this so that even if I get a repeat keyword I have to make something totally different. Anyway, I don't shed a tear if someone tries to profit off of it, most of it is mindless drivel.

  7. #7
    Member Fuinernel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    141
    Quote Originally Posted by bunky View Post
    I delete my writing HITs document as soon as I am done. I do this so that even if I get a repeat keyword I have to make something totally different. Anyway, I don't shed a tear if someone tries to profit off of it, most of it is mindless drivel.
    That's the way I think about it too, at least with the writing HITs and other web content writing I do. I understand that when I write it, I'm selling it to the requester or my client under a contract that removes any legal right I have to it. I understand what I'm doing, and how I'm being compensated. The people I sell it to can claim that they wrote what I wrote because it's in the contract that I choose to enter. However, my own creative works and writing that I do that is not under the kind of conditions that writing HITs put writers under, are an entirely different matter.

  8. #8
    I thought when you do these writing hits there something that says your pretty much giving them all the rights to what you submit and the work wont stay yours...idk i dont do these hits but there has to be something for them to be able to use it.

  9. #9
    Member Fuinernel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Gender
    Male
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    141
    Quote Originally Posted by mike1822 View Post
    I thought when you do these writing hits there something that says your pretty much giving them all the rights to what you submit and the work wont stay yours...idk i dont do these hits but there has to be something for them to be able to use it.
    Yes, that's exactly right. Most of the time, under these kinds of arrangements, the writer is selling the client full rights to his or her work. This means that the client can modify, publish, rip it apart or spin from it, in addition to claiming that someone other than the original writer wrote it. When doing these kinds of jobs, you become a sort of secret ghostwriter.

  10. #10
    I believe this is true. You give up rights. It makes it harder for you to provide samples of your work for others because technically you got no cred for them but hopefully others understand.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •