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Thread: Why you should plant parsnips / crock pot recipe

  1. #1
    Member ilovebeans's Avatar
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    Why you should plant parsnips / crock pot recipe

    I did not discover parsnips until I was waaaaaay grown. They have a taste and smell that is reminiscent of celery and herbs...sweet and very fresh. They have the growth habit, storage requirements and shape of carrots, but the roots are cream/white in color. They are another source of vitamins, without the vitamin A/beta carotene found in carrots. IMO a big flavor for a white root vegetable. Nutrition: Parsnips are very low in Saturated Fat and Cholesterol. They are a good source of Potassium, and a very good source of Dietary Fiber, Vitamin C, Folate and Manganese. Read More http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/...#ixzz2e2cItZbb. You can boil, mash and season them. You could cook them like carrots with orange and ginger. Anything you do with a carrot can be done with a parsnip, including cutting them into sticks and eating them raw.

    If you are in the northern hemisphere in say Zone 7 or warmer, today is a good day to plant parsnips, as well as carrots, radishes, beets and turnips for your fall garden. Root vegetables tolerate cold and frost, and in milder regions you can leave them in the ground and dig them out when you are ready to use them.

    Here is a crock pot recipe that includes parsnips:

    You will need:
    • A pound of bacon
    • cabbage
    • potatoes
    • onions
    • carrots
    • turnips
    • parsnips
    • a bay leaf
    • a crock pot, the larger the better. Hell, use two!
    • water


    How many potatoes or carrots or onions or turnips or parsnips? However many you want. My SO likes the cabbage, potatoes, carrot and onion best, so I make sure there are plenty of those. I love the flavor of the parsnips and turnips so I put those in for me.

    1. Clean the veggies and cut them if you feel you need to. I usually only cut up the largest ones just to they will fit together better in the crock pot. I quarter one cabbage. I leave skins on for nutrition.
    2. Put the veggies in the crock pot. I like to put the cabbage, potatoes and onions on the bottom layer. Then I fill the gaps with smaller carrots and parsnips chunks. I also like to put the turnips on the second layer. They soften faster than the potatoes.
    3. Tuck the bay leaf in there somewhere
    4. Take the bacon and lay the strips on top of the whole mess
    5. Fill the crock pot with water just up to the top of the veggies and underneath the layer of bacon
    6. Cook on low for 5 hours or so, or until the smell drives you nuts and you have to have some
    7. Remove the bay leaf
    8. Serve with butter, salt and fresh ground black peppercorns to taste


    Enjoy your parsnips!
    ilovebeans

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  3. #2
    This is making me drool!

    For the bacon, do you use regular bacon or something that's very lean? I'm concerned about the amount of fat that would result from using a pound of bacon.

    Sounds great, though. I've ever eaten parsnips before. I'll have to give them a try.

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    Member ilovebeans's Avatar
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    limcid,
    I am from the south and we are taught to use bacon, fatback, hamhock or hog jowls to provide fat and salt to flavor and season our veggies. You could use less bacon. You can also pour off the liquid after cooking which will contain the now hot liquid fat in the water. You know what that looks like. Let it cool a bit first, but not so much that the fat begins to harden or gelatinize (I think that is a word). I often reserve some or all liquid for the storage container. I use lower sodium bacon typically when I am preparing something for SO. When I select bacon for myself to fry, I like applewood smoked thick cut bacon. For this recipe, I just buy the cheapest low sodium option. I suppose you could also use turkey bacon, but I have never tried that.
    happy crocking
    ilovebeans

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    funny that i saw this post about parsnips, as just the other day i tried them for the first time, made a parsnip puree. They have a very distinct taste i cant say that i didnt like them but was not a huge fan either, maybe next time I will try them in this reciepe! thanks

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    The first time I ever had parsnips was about 12 years ago after my daughter married a man from Wales, and her mother in law had taught her how to make a cooked Sunday dinner, which includes meat, potatoes, carrots, parsnips, and usually broccoli.
    The parsnips were delicious, but nowadays when I cook them I just roast them in the oven, as it is just hubby and I, and a big cooked dinner is too much food
    My dad had told me last year I should plant parsnips, and I did try them, what the rabbits haven't go to are out there under the snow..... as soon as I can get to them, I am going to see what they did, but will definitely plan for planting more this year, thanks for the recipe!

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