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Thread: Would you like to be called Turkeys or Turkers?

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by RippedWarrior View Post
    I would say Turker, although I suppose we could be Turkee(s).
    Hmm...so if "to Turk" is the infinitive verb, and the person who does it is the "turker," I guess that would make those who the work is done for (aka requesters) the Turkee(s).

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  3. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by wbt View Post
    Hmm...so if "to Turk" is the infinitive verb, and the person who does it is the "turker," I guess that would make those who the work is done for (aka requesters) the Turkee(s).
    LOL
    This makes me wonder if Turkers are turkied by Turkees?

  4. #23
    Moderator RippedWarrior's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by wbt View Post
    Hmm...so if "to Turk" is the infinitive verb, and the person who does it is the "turker," I guess that would make those who the work is done for (aka requesters) the Turkee(s).
    It seems I was amiss - you are correct wbt. I was thinking (not too deeply) Requestor>Requestee, Turkor>Turkee.

    So the requester would be the Turkee.
    Last edited by RippedWarrior; 08-20-2013 at 03:10 PM.
    Eschew obfuscation, espouse elucidation. Batch HITs for newbs. 1000 req'd. 5000 req'd.

  5. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by wbt View Post
    No disrespect was meant by the "turkey" option, in case anyone was curious - it just opens the door to graphics and derivative (but not derisive) terminology a bit better.
    If you're interested in making graphics, might I recommend that you use chessboard and chesspiece motifs instead? This would be appropriate because the original Mechanical Turk that is the platform's namesake was designed to give the illusion that a machine could play chess, though there was actually a human hidden behind the scenes.

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  7. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by A2-D2 View Post
    If you're interested in making graphics, might I recommend that you use chessboard and chesspiece motifs instead?
    Usually for graphics I use an image of that original namesake, but the chess pieces imply strategic interaction between Turkers as part of the task, which there isn't - at least in the tasks I've posted so far.

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  9. #26
    Ah, OK. That makes sense.

  10. #27
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    I'm vastly outnumbered, as you see in this thread, but I call us TURKEYS!

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  12. #28
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    I got bored today and looked up the Ben Franklin and turkeys bit. I found an interesting take on that bit of history. The whole article is here, but its summed up near the end:

    "What are we to make of all this? On the one hand, Franklin's motive in writing the letter, from start to finish, is to attack the Society of the Cincinnati. While never impugning the valor of the former officers comprising the society, Franklin essentially calls them un-American, unreasonable, and uneducated. Moreover, read in conjunction with his earlier ridicule of the wearing of "ribbands and crosses" and the closing joke about vanity, Franklin's description of the character of the turkey who drives the redcoats out of the farmyard as courageous but "a little vain and silly" had to have been intended as a reflection on the society's organizers. His setting the joke about the turkey in a farmyard would have been immediately recognized by the classically-educated as an allusion to Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus himself, who gave up public office to return to his farm after saving Rome from invasion. Finally, if we read carefully, we can see that Franklin never says that the turkey would be better than the eagle as a symbol for the United States; he suggests instead that it would be better as a symbol for the Cincinnati.

    All that said, there is no reason to doubt that Franklin believed what he said about the character of the eagle. He may also have preferred not to have something that could be interpreted as carrying imperial connotations as the emblem of the new republic--although when he was himself made an honorary member of the Society of the Cincinnati in 1785, he seems to have had no compunctions about accepting his own little gilded "bird of bad moral character." In any case, whatever his views on the eagle, the story of Dr. Franklin's strenuous opposition to it when the great seal was under consideration, and his unsuccessful advocacy for replacing it with the turkey, is a gross exaggeration of the historical record. "

    So it was meant more as a dig against Cincinnati then as an actual candidate. And that concludes your history lesson for the day. There will be a test on Friday.

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  14. #29
    why would anyone want to be called a turkey?



  15. #30
    Didn't Star Trek fans have this same debate for decades? I'm pretty sure they settled on TrekERs (analogous to TurkERs) because "TrekIES" sounded too much like "CrazIES"... not sure how relevant it is here, but I like the sound of TurkER better anyway.

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